Regulations

Single-Family Homes – Interior Lots


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  • A 3 foot fence is permitted in the required front yard area, also known as the first 20 feet of a property measured from the front property line; 
  • A 6 foot fence is permitted on any side and rear yard area (outside of the required front yard area); and
  • A 7 foot fence is conditionally permitted on any side or rear yard area (outside of the required front yard area) with permits from the Planning and Building Divisions and written consent from adjacent neighbors.
Single-Family Homes – Corner Lots


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  • A 3 foot fence is permitted in the required front yard area, also known as the first 20 feet of a property measured from the front property line;
  • No fence may exceed 3 feet in height within the 35 foot traffic visibility triangle at a street intersection to preserve pedestrian, bicyclist and vehicle safety;
  • A 6 foot fence is permitted along the side yard adjacent to a street, but must be located 5 feet from the side property line and, in no case, shall be located at the edge of sidewalk. A side property line is often located 3 to 5 feet from the back edge of the sidewalk;
  • A 6 foot fence is permitted on the interior side and rear yard area (outside of the required front yard area); and
  • A 7 foot fence is conditionally permitted on any side or rear yard area (outside of the required front yard area) with permits from the Planning and Building Divisions and written consent from adjacent neighbors.

For a single-family home located on a corner lot where the rear yard meets the side yard of an adjacent property, the following additional fence setback applies:


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  • No fence may exceed 3 feet in height within the first 10 feet of a property where the driveway is located adjacent to the rear yard of a neighboring property
Other Residential Properties (Multi-Family and HOA communities)
Other residential properties with or without a homeowners association (HOA), such as apartments, Planned Unit Development projects (small-lot single-family, rowhomes, townhomes), and condominiums, can have fence standards specific to their community, typically identified in original design plans or in governing documents, such as Covenance, Conditions and Restrictions (CC&R’s) or Master Plans.

Any new fencing needs to comply with the standards and permitted locations noted in the approved plans or governing documents, as well as meet City standards. Any new fence proposed on a residential property within one of these communities requires a permit from the Planning Division and, depending on height and materials, may require a building permit.
Commercial and Industrial Properties
Fencing materials for commercial and industrial properties should be of commercial grade and compatible with the existing building in site. All fencing or walls on a commercial or industrial property, no matter the height or material, require a Planning permit and may require a Building permit.
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